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KCC automotive plugs in dynometer

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Posted: Friday, June 24, 2011 11:10 pm

PUHI — The installation of a $75,000 dynometer brought the Kaua‘i Community College automotive department into the arena of high technology, said KCC instructor Tante Azares, Wednesday.

Bret Williamson of Colorado Springs, Colo. was on campus conducting training for the new dynometer with alumni of the KCC Automotive Technology program and staff of the college’s automotive department.

“The most important facet of this new piece of equipment is reducing liability,” KCC instructor Darryl Gerardo said. “The students can now troubleshoot, diagnose problems, and test a car without having to do the road test.”

The dynometer works to analyze a wide variety of data by using a computerized collection box connected to a rolling wheel which drives the automobile. Additional data is collected using auxiliary sensors connected to the collection box.

Data is transferred to computers for analysis and corrective action with data available in real time as corrective measures are taken.

Williamson said the data can also be transferred to other computers for classroom learning.

Azares said the college purchased the dynometer several years ago, but did not have it hooked up due to the cost involved for installation.

He said a grant allowed the instrument to finally be hooked up and made operational. KCC is now the only college in the University of Hawai‘i system to have this type of dynometer.

Labeled a chassis dyno, Azares said it allows drivers an opportunity to get true horsepower ratings produced by an automobile without having to run the cars down a track.

“This dyno brings the high tech world of automotive to the students,” Azares said.

The goals of KCC automotive program include preparing the student with the skills and competencies necessary for a successful career as an automotive technician, states the KCC website.

In addition to skills needed, the program also provides the student with the basic skills necessary to become a lifelong learner in order to keep abreast of the latest technological advances in the automotive field.

Go to www.kauai.hawaii.edu for more information.

• Dennis Fujimoto, photographer and staff writer, can be reached at 245-3681 (ext. 253) or dfujimoto@ thegardenisland.com.

© 2015 Thegardenisland.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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8 comments:

  • Regular Guy Giving Just Retorts posted at 12:01 pm on Sat, Jun 25, 2011.

    Regular Guy Giving Just Retorts Posts: 941

    Ha, that was a long lag in posting!

     
  • Regular Guy Giving Just Retorts posted at 11:18 am on Sat, Jun 25, 2011.

    Regular Guy Giving Just Retorts Posts: 941

    Billy offers sage advice intended to be informative.

    Welcome to reality.

     
  • Regular Guy Giving Just Retorts posted at 10:48 am on Sat, Jun 25, 2011.

    Regular Guy Giving Just Retorts Posts: 941

    Sage advice billy offers here; best of all it isn't sugar coated.

    Welcome to reality people.

     
  • billyjoebob posted at 10:30 am on Sat, Jun 25, 2011.

    billyjoebob Posts: 1276

    [quote]Julie96766 said: "It's a good thing KCC is NOT an auto repair shop AM I RIGHT? lol I'm glad our students have better equipment then the repair shops, if they had the same equipment, then that would be sad.There is also a ton of kids going into auto repair.. I don't know where you get your useless statistics from. Stop making stuff up."[/quote]

    I have been in the industry almost 40 years.
    While " tons " may enter the field It is my observation that most will not stay. ( see the above post ), which is all so common.
    The stress is great, the pay, below average for entry level to experienced, the cost of tools is very high, keeping up to date on the current technology is always a challenge.
    I was complimenting KCC and the field in general and stating that there should be more of these kind technical trade classes.

     
  • albino posted at 10:06 am on Sat, Jun 25, 2011.

    albino Posts: 79

    Further reading
    http://www.allpar.com/dealers/exmechanic.html

     
  • albino posted at 9:44 am on Sat, Jun 25, 2011.

    albino Posts: 79

    As someone who went into this field and went to trade school for 2.5 years its pretty easy to explain why this field is dying.This all has happened to my friends too. Some who went to even more prestigious schools than I.
    1.) As soon as you graduate guess where you start. Changing oil. Like anyone would have fresh out of high school. Try and pay back a tuition on $8.50 and still make your rent.

    2.) The Flat rate pay system. You get paid by the job. Oil change for example .3 hours. Which means you have to do 3-4 just to make your wage in one hour. Timing belt. about 3 hours. Not exactly a lot of time to make sure everything is done the best it can. Most mechanics here make $17 a flat rate hour. TSA pays more than that! And its guaranteed. If its a slow day and you get 3 hours of work than that's all you make.
    3.) The tools. I understand mechanics are supposed to buy tools. But when you start needing $30K worth of tools to do all the cars is ridiculous. Thats a year wages!
    Thats why.

     
  • Julie96766 posted at 9:36 am on Sat, Jun 25, 2011.

    Julie96766 Posts: 91

    [quote]billyjoebob said: "This tool, a dynometer, is not practical in most auto repair shops.I hope it is cost effective in this application.We are an automobile based society at this point in time and it is a shame to see less and less people entering the field.I have heard good things about this program at KCCHigh school auto shops are almost nil nowadays. Yet you look around the school yard and what do you see?Tons of vehicles.Way more techs retiring from the business then entering.Like everything else, expect to pay more for repairs."[/quote]

    It's a good thing KCC is NOT an auto repair shop AM I RIGHT? lol I'm glad our students have better equipment then the repair shops, if they had the same equipment, then that would be sad.

    There is also a ton of kids going into auto repair.. I don't know where you get your useless statistics from. Stop making stuff up.

     
  • billyjoebob posted at 7:55 am on Sat, Jun 25, 2011.

    billyjoebob Posts: 1276

    This tool, a dynometer, is not practical in most auto repair shops.
    I hope it is cost effective in this application.
    We are an automobile based society at this point in time and it is a shame to see less and less people entering the field.
    I have heard good things about this program at KCC
    High school auto shops are almost nil nowadays.
    Yet you look around the school yard and what do you see?
    Tons of vehicles.
    Way more techs retiring from the business then entering.
    Like everything else, expect to pay more for repairs.

     

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